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Discussion Starter #1
Guys,

Do any of you know if


Guys,

Do any of you know if WUR are interchangeable? Mine from a 1985 Euro GTSi QV is not exactly working well. (It got drowned, another story here). I opened it up, cleaned it out and it works but I have a hot start problem, obviously I must have slightly upset the setting. I can only start the engine when hot by hand-pressuring the sensor plate to get fuel delivered for a start.

New ones are difficult to come by and expensive.

Can other WUR from say Mercedes, Audi, porsche etc. be fitted?

Thanks for your insights.
 
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Discussion Starter #2
CTK,

Please excuse me,


CTK,

Please excuse me, but I am not familiar with all of the Ferrari acronyms. What is the WUR?

Jeremy
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Jeremy,

Sorry. WUR = Warm U


Jeremy,

Sorry. WUR = Warm Up Regulator, it is a K-Jet part for the fuel injection system. It controls the fuel pressure.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Ah!!! Ok. It probably has a Bo

Ah!!! Ok. It probably has a Bosch part number on it. I would be that it can be cross referenced to another MFG.

JL
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Hi CTK, welcome aboard.

Aft


Hi CTK, welcome aboard.

After you change a WUR or even if you successfuly rebuilt one, your Fuel Mixture will need to be checked and set if neccesary using an Exhaust Gas Analyzer.

Any time FM (fuel mixture) falls out of range (normal 0.8%-1.2% CO) either high or low it will make an engine difficult or immpossivble to start.

HTH's

Regards, JRV
ps: how did you end up solving your InterCooler problem?
 
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Discussion Starter #7
JRV,

Thanks for the welcome


JRV,

Thanks for the welcome.

Still driving without the intercooler. Can't get anyone who wants to 'mess' with it. Ah Well! just have to drive off boost once in awhile.

BTW, have you any recommendations as to what the fuel system pressure should be?

In the fuel mixture dept. I've set my CO to 1.4%
Cold starts are fine but hot starts are a real pain. I've been thinking of adjusting the WUR by 'tapping the 'balance pin' in the WUR body. What do you think?

ctk
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Hi CTK,

On the fuel system


Hi CTK,

On the fuel system pressure issue. If your old WUR still has cold & hot functions then pressures of 2.8 Bar cold warming up to 3.2-3.4 Bar warm, would be fine.

Yes you can tap on the pin, going in raises FP (leaner) and pulling out lowers FP (richer). When adjusting the WUR you'll need to monitor with FP Gauges.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter #9
AWESOME!

Like having your o


AWESOME!

Like having your own private knowledge store to draw on.

Question is, with my hot start problem on the WUR, should I lean it out or enrichen it?

Any thoughts appreciated.

ctk
 
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Discussion Starter #10
A Description of WUR by a chat

A Description of WUR by a chatter David who replied to my query. Hope this is useful for some of you out there. Thanks David.

K-Jetronic WUR Description

The warmup regulator is responsible for controlling the amount of fuel delivered to the engine during it's warm-up period. The pressure acting upon the top of the control plunger varies depending on the engine temperature and provides an effective method of enrichment.
The control pressure is tapped off from the primary pressure circuit in the metering head's lower chamber through a tiny restrictive hole which gives it the ability to differentiate between the two pressures. A flexible pipe then connects the control plunger gallery to the warm-up-regulator and returns back to the metering head to a connection next to the primary pressure regulator's transfer valve. This valve is in the circuit to close the fuel from the control circuit when the engine is off, avoiding the total loss of system pressure while the engine is stationary.

The internals of the warm-up-regulator are quite simple comprising an inlet and outlet port, a stainless steel shim, a bi-metalic heated strip and a spring.

The input to the warm-up-regulator flows into a small chamber in the top of the unit, its return is through a small drilling and back to the metering head. By controlling this return flow it will cause a change in pressure acting on the top of the control plunger. With a cold engine the flow must be fairly free giving it a lower pressure. This will allow a higher lift of the plunger which in turn will enrich the mixture under these conditions. The free flow is obtained by the internal bi-metalic strip exerting a downward pressure on the spring which decreases the pressure acting upon the shim, this lower force allows the fuel to flow almost uninterrupted.

As the bi-metalic strip is heated, by either it's heater element or natural heat soak from the engine, the downward pressure acting on the spring is gradually decreased, increasing the force of the spring, which in turn increases the control pressure.

Typical cold engine control pressure will be as low as 1.0 bar increasing over approx. 10 minutes to around 3.5 bar. Some warm-up-regulators have a vacuum connection that will sense a drop in vacuum and lower the control pressure during these acceleration periods.

The voltage supply to the regulator is from the fuel pump relay, because if the ignition was on without the engine running, all enrichment would be removed as the bi-metalic strip would be heated prematurely and the driver would not benefit from the cold engine enrichment.

The two pipes that connect to the warm-up-regulator have different sized 'banjo unions' to avoid them being connected incorrectly. The control pressures quoted are as an example only and reference should be made to the technical data as these pressures can be specific to the part number located on the unit's housing.
This unit will have a resistance value of approximately 20 to 26 Ohms.

So...by using the incorrect regulator, several things happen:

1)The mixture during the warm up phase may be too lean, or rich.

2)Driveability during warm-up may suffer.

3)Only fully warmed up, the volume of fuel may be lower (hence leaner) than the Euro regulator.

4)One can be deceived in thinking that the mixture is correct, as it will be possible to set the idle C.O. and HC levels to the correct Euro or USA specs.

However...if you have the control pressure graphs for both regulators, you may find that the differences are minor.

Hope this helps,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #11
You're welcome...
And I h


You're welcome...
And I hope this info proved to be helpful.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #12
>>A Description of WUR

>>A Description of WUR by a chatter David who replied to my query.<<

Damn David you cheatin on us?

{
}
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Well, actually no.

I posted


Well, actually no.

I posted that note on "the other bored" about a year ago...HA!
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Guys,

Coming back to my ori


Guys,

Coming back to my original question, are there alternatives to the Euro K-Jet WUR for the 308GTSi QV?

I rather not have to fiddle around with it to try adjustments and a new one costs too much and is difficult to get.

Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
Hi CTK,

there may well be a


Hi CTK,

there may well be a WUR with the same essential specs that "would work"....(of course if it's not "close enough" and one fries a piston or two the savings on WUR's would be a mute point), all one would need to do is get the Factory Specs on all the hundreds of WUR's part #'s (from the sources listed below in Resource Section-FI Sources) and compare them to the specs on the Bosch/Ferrari WUR.

More work than I'm interested in and more risk with someone else's Ferrari engine than I'm willing to take.

Gee, I'm becoming "risk adverse" is that a sign of being smart or just getting older? {
}

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter #16
CTK,

another thought, are y


CTK,

another thought, are you sure that Koenig used a stock 308 WUR on a custom Turbo Motor? Seems to me they may have used a 930 Turbo WUR with boost enrichment circuit.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter #17
JRV,

You are one smart cook


JRV,

You are one smart cookie! The WUR does have a boost enrichment circuit via an external vacuum hose.
The part numbers on the WUR have been removed. I just figured that it would not have been cost efficient for Koenig or Bosch to have made one-off parts but would have selected a closely matched generic item that suits the needs. (I'm only hoping here!). From what I have seen, usually the different part numbers relate to the housing differences. The fuel pipe mounting positions, fitting sizes and positions and with or without two vacuum points etc. As far as I can see, the internal parts consists of a heating element and a fine mesh filter and the adjustment pin.

JRV, David any further advice?

CTK
 
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Discussion Starter #18
Hi CTK,

sometimes there&#39


Hi CTK,

sometimes there's no substitute for experience.


I would look into securing a WUR from an 80-85 Euro 930 Turbo. I think the important digits are 053. The Porsches had a 3.3L Turbo engine so all the specs and accesories (boost enrichment) will be well within spec to safely run on your engine.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter #20
>>Still driving withou

>>Still driving without the intercooler. Can't get anyone who wants to 'mess' with it. Ah Well! just have to drive off boost once in awhile.<<

CTK,

Its risky to drive without an intercooler.

I just finished a Maserati Bora and am waiting on an Anniversary Edition Countach. I got some time to look at this intercooler for you if you want since parts for this Countach will take forever to get here.

Why don't you send it over and I'll "mess" with it for you? I'm already helping out a customer with his Diablo shocks for Lamborghini-Talk. As an F-Talk member from out of the country with no resources to fix the problem, I'll be willing to do this at cost as long as I can post pictures to help out and educate other users.

Regards,
JRV
 
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