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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the proper procedure t

What is the proper procedure to romove the heater cores on an '85 308? The boxes are in very tight spaces and , while I did replace the foam filters last year, I could barely get the them in. The reason I ask is that I suspect that I might have a small leak in one of them. Here's why:

Each time I take a very sharp turn at a slightly accelerated speed, I get a strong, distinct smell of coolant in the cockpit. It immediately dissipates and only occurs under that condition and never lasts for more than a few seconds. Since the smell is within the cockpit, I'm guessing that the smell must be coming through the vent(s), meaning the source is likely in a heater core. I've checked all of the hoses in that area and heater control valve and everything is tight and dry. There is no sign of leakage on the ground and the coolant level remains stabile. Any ideas about this besides the cores?So, I'd like to remove the cores and check them out closely. The box on the passenger side has an ac component in front of it. Do I have to dc the hose on this to move it aside to get the box/ core out?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
One more Q-- in the event of a

One more Q-- in the event of a major leak from a heater core while on the road, would it be possible to just bypass it altogther via connecting the the 2 hoses together which feed the core? Would there be any ill-effects of this aside from the loss of heat in the cockpit? Given that many 308 owners complain of excessively hot interiors, would this be a solution to this in the summer months?
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bill,
I can't comment on


Bill,
I can't comment on removing the heater cores, as I have never done that repair on a 308.

However, as to disconnecting the cores, by connecting the hoses together...A very viable solution with no ill effects. You could do this at the cores, or install a shut-off valve in the engine compartment.

As to the high cabin temperatures...I can relate!
Both my old 308 QV and current BB are quite warm in the summer, interior-wise. I feel the problem is more the large windshield, and rake...then "hot air leakage" from the cores.

One benefit of having the heater cores connected is that they can be used as "auxilary radiators" in the summer time. On extremely hot days, I turn the heat on in the BB, but don't open the vents into the car. The extra capacity of the heater cores can help cool the engine further.

You might want to consider adding some UV dye into the cooling system...and then check for leaks using a black light. This method is very helpful for tracking down difficult to find leaks.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Mr. Van Dyne,

Have a fu


Hi Mr. Van Dyne,

Have a full "How-To" article on this very subject - instructions/pictures, etc. My LH was bypassed using Al pipe when purchased - can send you piece if you'd like. Shoot me an email at:
[email protected]
Be glad to help you out.

Carl
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dave--when you say a "shut

Dave--when you say a "shut off valve in the engine compartment", do you mean something to stop the flow of coolant through the long 5/8" heater hose? Would just crimping that hose accomplish the same effect, with no malfunction of the cooling system? Not that I'd do this, but I find it interesting. Thanks, as always

Carl--I'd love to see that article--thank you!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bill,

A shut-off valve...Ex


Bill,

A shut-off valve...Exactly! The previous owner, or maybe Ferrari?? had installed one in the engine compartment on the BB. It cut-off all water flow to the long 5/8" hose you refer to. It looked a bit too K-mart for me, so I ditched the valve....and replaced the entire heater hose, frontback to front, just to be safe. Oh, what joy!!

And Bill..yes, you can accomplish the same thing by merely crimping off the heater cores...though you still have coolant in the long 5/8" hose. No biggie...

Regards,
David
 
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