Ferrari Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Out enjoying the sun in my 348

Out enjoying the sun in my 348 today and after a somewhat brisk drive found that i'd lost the clutch. Fluid is dripping from the transmission casing. Clutch slave cylinder? Never done one before - how difficult are they and should i replace the whole clutch? Any advice / diagrams would be appreciated
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Yes sounds like slave cylinder

Yes sounds like slave cylinder seals. A little on the difficult side . I'm leaving in a few seconds with friends but I'll try to do a write up later. Call Algar first thing Monday to find out if the seals are still availible!!!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi JRV, Any help/photos's/

Hi JRV, Any help/photos's/diagrams would be much appreciated. Would you advise replacing the complete clutch at the same time as doing the slave cylinder as it was ok before the cylinder lost all it's fluid? Jason
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If the clutch is of servicible

If the clutch is of servicible thickness and is completely dry (of brake <n.e.> fluid) and the pressure plate(s) are fine, the just replace the clutch slave (or seals).

If you attempt to just replace the seals, examine the clutch slave bore very carefully, tiny little pits in the surface will allow the new seals to leak.

I should mention that the 98+ 355 slave cylinder (for the F1 tranny) with teflon seals has better (lower) friction than the older 355 or 348 slave cylinders.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
To add to what Mitch says, I&#

To add to what Mitch says, I'm not sure the 348/Early 355 seals are still availible. That's why I suggested you check on that before we get the cart before the horse.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Took it apart last night. The

Took it apart last night. The slave cylinder / throw-out bearing has blown a massive split around it (not a seal but the actual alloy casing) - loosing all clutch fluid. Looks as though it needs that along with both clutch plates as they are worn also.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ahhh, and older 2-plate 348 cl

Ahhh, and older 2-plate 348 clutch. I suspect the vast majority of these have been converted to a quieter single plate version by now.

In any event, that slave is toast.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Have renewed clutch plates - o

Have renewed clutch plates - ok. Have renewed the cylinder with an upgraded item. Refitted - bleed the clutch fluid - started engine and still cannot get any gears. I've double checked the clutch assembly and the slave is moving freely on the shaft. Good resistance on clutch pedal - but - no gears - help!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ask JRV if it is safe to put y

Ask JRV if it is safe to put your 348 into gear with the engine off, then to bump the starter (no clutch pedal) to turn the tranny just a bit.

On some cars you have to do that after clutch/tranny work (for the first time only) after a repair.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've read alot of posts re

I've read alot of posts re: problems with bleeding the clutch. Could it be that it still has air in the system. I've gone through 1 litre of fluid already
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Air in the clutch fluid line w

Air in the clutch fluid line would mean no resistance on the clutch pedal.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
On second thought, you might h

On second thought, you might have air trapped high in your clutch line, and the way to exhale it would be to have the rear of the car jacked up a bit during the clutch bleed.

I'd try a second bleed, first.

Could also be a clutch installation issue...or you could have a new throw-out bearing that has the wrong throw length...to which you'd need to adjust the set-up height to get your clutch to disengage.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
After traveling from the clutc

After traveling from the clutch master cylinder towards the rear of the engine bay, the clutch line Tees off. One line runs vertically and then into the clutch housing, the other line runs out towards the bleed valve.

So, to bleed the clutch, one needs to be displacing fluid into the clutch slave cylinder. The only way I know how to do this is to depress the clutch pedal (several times) between each individual bleed operation. By depressing the clutch pedal, one moves the clutch (n.e. brake) fluid up this tube and into the slave.

Don't be surprised if this takes a considerable amount of tries before the clutch is working normally. Eventually, you will have pushed enough fluid into the slave and the air will be expelled.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top