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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have removed one lower plenu

I have removed one lower plenum (3-piece) from the TR, and one injector. I plan on testing all injectors with my tester.

When I removed the injector, I was able to remove the e-clip, injector and one small, thick, o-ring. It seems that I will have to machine a "driver" to remove the bushing.

Also, I have noted rust on the metal portion of most fuel lines.......that area where the metal meets the rubber. I am thinking of replacing these. These where only seen after I removed the upper plenum, since they lay beneath.

Any thoughts?

Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Henry...have you heard from an

Henry...have you heard from any others about removing the injector bushings? I would be very interested to know, since I'm near that stage too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Jeff: I haven't heard

Hi Jeff: I haven't heard anything. Below is a picture, showing the bushing removal tool above, and the install tool below, with 3 bushings below that. I will remove all, since I want to clean off the corrosion. I plan on using generic O-rings of the same size......except for the very thick small one, on the injector....I will buy these.

Did you remove the inner O-ring from the bottom of the bushing?

How did you drain the coolant from the engine block?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Henry: I simply drained all t

Henry: I simply drained all the coolant out of the left side radiator plug ( or petcock ). I haven't had any problems with any "weeping" or anything. I have yet to pull even one injector, as I've been following your efforts closely. I will be posting pics of my refinished cam covers, and painted engine block, probably tomorrow. As for "generic" o-rings, make sure that they are compatible with fuel/oil, etc. From the lack of responses, it looks like we are in this together!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Gents,
Years ago...when I had


Gents,
Years ago...when I had my shop, we would only replace the upper thick injector o-ring. The busings and corresponding seals you've removed were not part of a "normal service" in that they're primary function is to locate the injector, rather than to create an atmospheric seal. Considering the age of these cars now, likely I'd go through the trouble you're going to...and replace all the seals.

Although I have never pulled the injector holders on a Ferrari, VW and some other K/KE-jet cars used a similar type holder. On the VW, the holder which are made of plastic can be a real bear to remove...and often break. The seals are usually as hard as a rock...and can prove to be difficult to remove. Often times, the complete injector holder can be immersed in carb "cold tank" type cleaner...which will eat away at the rubber, to faciltate easier dissasembly. Note that all plastic parts will be detroyed, though.

The TR injector holders and guides can be gently cleaned using media, if necessary.

Installation of the o-rings and seals should be done with a non-silicon product...as O2 sensor damage will occur. Typically, I would use gearbox oil as a lubricant...as the injector will fit quite snugly in the new donut seal.

FYI, the donut seal is not unique to Ferrari, as it is the same as (virtually, as far as I remember) every other K/KE-jet car made.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Jeff: When you remove the inj

Jeff: When you remove the injectors, you will also be removing some of the bushings at the same time. The "press" fit is minimal......some of the injectors are held tighter in the bushing, than the bushing is held by the intake.

To remove the injectors use two screwdrivers, one on each side, and pry up against the intake, with the tip of the screwdrivers 180 degrees apart, and set just below the nut portion of the injector......very easy!!!!!!!

I have most out, and will clean them, and replace the O-rings. I agree with David, due to the age.

David: To me, NO service done by an owner will be "normal service". We ALL seem to go too far!!!!!!!!!haha Also, while the bushings are only guides, the O-ring around it does prevent "loose" air from entering around them. If it is dried out, or cracked, in any way, then air will enter.

Jeff: BTW, did you prime the parts before painting? I replaced a valve cover gasket about a year ago.....cleaned and painted the cover.....but now see small bits of paint flaking off.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Henry: Yep...the all but two

Henry: Yep...the all but two injectors and bushings came out together. Since I'm replacing my injectors, I used one as a "pin" to tap the others out. I then used an appropriate deep socket to gently tap the bushing off the injector. Very painless operation for a change. The bushings and o-rings look good, no cracks or anything. But some of the injectors o-rings were cracked. I also had lots of rust on several injectors that was not apparent as it was down inside the bushing. I soaked all the intake plenums in solvent, and then flushed them out real good. Nice and clean in and out now.

As for painting my engine and cam covers, I've posted pics over at the "other" website.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Jeff, good to hear you cleaned

Jeff, good to hear you cleaned the insides of the intake runners....it makes the engine run cleaner at idle.



As far as primer before paint. Although certianly not mandatory, priming with Zinc Chromate primer does help the wrinkle paint bond stronger & last longer. The Zinc Chromate bonds tightly to Aluminum and gives the upper coat a layer to tightly bond too.

I think Eastwood still sells zinc chromate in spray cans.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Your right about the primer, I

Your right about the primer, I probably should have used it. The VHT representative said their latest crinkle paint is so good that no primer is required. I do have to say it seems durable. I used a small fine to remove paint from the raised edges of the cam covers, and that paint is pretty tough. I'm also a believer in baking the paint. We have a large walk-in oven where I work, and I'm always going in after hours or on weekends and using the oven to bake my parts.

I like this website of yours JRV...at first I was hesitant, since I'm loyal to the "other" site. But browsing around here changed my mind. I see there is tons of good technical information, and that's what I need the most right now. It's great that you share your vast knowledge with those of us less-learned.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
>>I like this website

>>I like this website of yours JRV<<

Jeff thanks...however..this is not "my" website, I just happen to be the guy that opened it...it's actually yours and Henrys and Drews and Davids and Joes and on and on. It's "ours", with the our being everyone that wants to share, learn, discuss, help others, etc ....I can't answer every question, nor would I ever wish to...yes I may be farther upstream than some others, but I see myself as much as a student as I do mentor...I love to learn and share what I've learned with others that share the same passion. Watching others work their way through situations to winning resolutions is really a beautiful, rewarding thing to watch. The old germans I apprenticed with in my youth used to say " the real advertisments aren't in the garage, they're out there driving around". And hopefully with tips and perhaps savings we can get more guys driving around! {
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