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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While working the fuel pump wi

While working the fuel pump wiring, I noticed a leak coming from the front of the car.......aren't Ferraris FUN????????????????? I removed the lower valence, and found a small leak, coming from the front of the left vertical radiator end piece.

It is easily accessable.........lucky me!!!!!! The leak is at the junction of where a metal frame support bracket attaches to the radiator end piece.

The end piece is magnetic, so I assume it is steel. The idea would be to add filler around the edge of the support bracket, where it meets the radiator. Should I weld it, or just solder it?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Henry,

the radiator is made


Henry,

the radiator is made of several different pieces. The outer steel shielding/bracket and the inner brass core and header tanks.

The brass (the part that's leaking)is silver soldered together, the outer steel is welded, but not together.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
JRV: The "header tanks&#3

JRV: The "header tanks" are on the sides of the radiator, on a Boxer, and not on top.....as traditional.

Both the side header tank, and bracket, are magnetic......therefore not brass, which is non-ferrous.

I removed a side shield, and it appears that that the leak goes somewhat around the header tank.........follows the steel bracket.

I will remove the radiator, weld it up along the whole bracket, and send it out to have it cleaned and pressure tested. This was never done to this car......so I figure, it is about time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Being that the radiator is so

Being that the radiator is so old, would it not be better to just have a new one made, out of aluminum? Would this be a benefit? I can always fix mine, and sell it on e-bay!!!!!!!!

Ferrari of UK wants about $1100 for one (exchange).........plus 17% duty, and shipping.

Where do I find a QUALITY source to make a new radiator for me?

Thanks
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Henry,

honestly I've ne


Henry,

honestly I've never seen a Boxer radiator that needed replacing (yet). They are of the type that are easily taken apart, cleaned and put back together to provide another 10-20 yrs of service trouble free.

Any real old timey radiator shop can completely rebuild your radiator in 2 days or less for no more than $250 MAX...probably less.

Surely there is a radiator shop in your part of the country? If not send it down here and the oldtimers that do ALL my stuff can fix it better than new .
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
FWIW, brass/copper radiators a

FWIW, brass/copper radiators are way more efficient cooling. I have several places locally that rebuild my rads, normally for less than $100. Local hot rodder shops can make any radiator that size for under $1000 from scratch.
Brian
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Recently had my radiator out f

Recently had my radiator out for re-core. It, too, was leaking. Cost $500. Most recommend against aluminum. First, not original. Second, can't paint it black to look original. Third, not as efficient when it comes to heat transfer. Fourth, while lighter in weight, unless racing, not an issue.

At the same time I had the radiator out, I evacuated A/C system and had new condensor built and installed. Front end looks like new.

Jim S.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Jim S: So what material did y

Jim S: So what material did you use for the core....brass, or copper?

How is the core attached to the steel side headers?

Can I remove the radiator, without having to remove the A/C condensor?
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Henry - I took it to a radiato

Henry - I took it to a radiator shop, and they just did it. The core is copper and the surrounding frame and headers are brass. They solder everything, and hence the need to use compatible materials (brass and copper). The radiator can be removed without removing the condensor, but USE EXTREME CARE not to bend all of the fins on the condensor. They are like tissue paper. One trick is to remove the plastic cover over the wire harness on the front side of the wheel well fiberglass. My BBi has this. I do not know if your version has it. It will afford a little more clearance. You will have to remove the thin aluminum shields on either side of the radiator, but they come out easy. The rubber seal simply pulls off the top of them. Of course, the fans come out. I assume your fans are behind the radiator (towards the rear) and pull air through. If you have the earlier model with fans in front that push air through then all bets are off as I do not know much about this model vis-a-vis radiator removal. If you decide to dive in, let me know and I can put together more details.

Jim S.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Jim S: By "..plastic cove

Jim S: By "..plastic cover...", are you referring to the flat pieces, where the strut goes through? The fans are behind the radiator. I removed one aluminum shield, to see the extent of the leak (on the left side).

I assume the fans come out first. Please tell me that I don't have to remove the hood!!!

I plan on taking it out this weekend. I couldn't find a radiator shop in Green Bay....can you believe that? May have to take it to Milwaukee, Chicago......or send it to JRV!!!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Henry,

call around to some


Henry,

call around to some industrial fleet companies that have been in business a long time, they will likely have a source. The reason you need to go the heavy fleet/industrial route is they will have OLD technology sources that REPAIR things not simply replace. The guys I use have a nice fancy name Downtown Radiator, they've been in the same location 50 yrs. they don't even sell plastic radiators...all they do is rebuild real Metal Radiators. Fleets of trucks need radiator work every few years so some oldtimers probably exist in your area. The yellow pages or internet isn't the best way to find what you're looking for. Try calling some truck stops or old auto repair shops.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No, Henry, you do not have to

No, Henry, you do not have to remove the bonnet. The plastic cover is really a tube runing around the spare tire well, on the radiator side. It covers the wiring harness, and has 4 8mm screws that hold it in place. By taking it out you get another 5 centimeters of space which helps a great deal.

Yes, the fans must come out. The job is really very easy. Removing the hoses is always a challenge - go to the hardware store and purchase the proper tool (looks like a dentist tooth probe). Slide it into the hose-pipe junction and swing it around the entire circumference to break the seal. I use silicone spray to put the hoses back on - it allows easy twisting and movement of the hose on the aluminum pipe.

You will need two people to gently lift the radiator out once separated from the A/C condensor and its mounting points. Take out all of the rubber shock mounts (on top) first. The side rubber shock mounts can stay, but you need to remove the nuts on the upper aspect, leaving the mount attached to the chassis. Or you can take the mount out with the radiator, whichever seems easier. Have fun.

Jim S.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I took my radiator in, and was

I took my radiator in, and was shown several places where it leaked.......small "white" spots at the sources of pin-hole size holes. The last re-core was a "bad" job! Should get it back next Monday.

It will be re-cored, and done right, for $475. I thought of replacing the condensor, as Jim S. did, but the A/C still works well.....will wait till it proves to be a problem.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I just got my radiator back. T

I just got my radiator back. They stated that the core, that I had, was the original one. They had to have the new core specially made, since, it was so wide.

They did install a "4 tube core", instead of the original "3 tube core". They told me that the cooling effect would be the same.

Total price: $501, with tax.

I will install it this weekend.
 
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