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Discussion Starter #1
I ordered NGK B8EUX plugs &#40

I ordered NGK B8EUX plugs (platinum). The store called me and stated that these where superceded by BR8EIX (iridium) plugs. Are these resistor plugs? If so, I would think that I have the wrong plugs!!!! These are for an 83 BBi.
 
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Discussion Starter #2
BR8EIX

resistor plugs have


BR8EIX

resistor plugs have an R in the # somewhere to my knowledge. So these appear to be resistor plugs.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
are they the wrong plugs?

s


are they the wrong plugs?

sorry Henry, skipped over that part.

Well......with resitor wires, resistor plugs are unnecesary in the older cars without computers.

The real answer is probably one for David Fienberg...or one of the other guys here that have me beat in quite a few of these areas..{
}...hopefully one of our more knowledgable colleagues will answer so we can all learn a little something today...
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Searching the web, I found the

Searching the web, I found the NGK company site. Plugging in 83 BBi came up with:

standard plug = B8EV
iridium plug = BR8EIV

Both are to be gapped at 0.020

It appears that there is no platinum plug for this car, as stated by the plug supplier.

Maybe iridium plugs need more resistance!!!!!!

But it appears that these are the right plugs.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
>>Maybe iridium plugs

>>Maybe iridium plugs need more resistance!!!!!! <<

David Fienberg recently wrote about platinum vs iridium....look back in his ignition thread for the scoop.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Here's the scoop:

Orgin


Here's the scoop:

Orginal plugs on an injected BB: B8EV (non-resistor)

Platinum number: B8EVX (non-resistor, but NA)

Iridium number: BR8EIX (resistor type plug)-current "correct" plug.

And Yes...I beat this issue to death with NGK. It seems that they're phasing out of the platinum plugs for certain "non-popular" applications...and replacing them with the Iridium type, which all appear to be resistor plugs.

By design, the Iridium plug is the best in terms of anti-fouling characteristics, in that the center electrode is very, very small. The resistance, according to NGK is a non-issue...and would only be detrimental under the most extreme A/F ratio conditions. I am now running the Iridium plugs in my carbed, high-compression BB, without any issues, what so ever.

As these new plugs will fire at a slightly lower voltage, you could open the gap 0.005" without any problems.

Clearly the right choice...Henry.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
David: Thanks for the answer.

David: Thanks for the answer......glad I don't have to send these back.

What changes when the gap is too small, or too large. I know that a larger gap will take more voltage to cross, but if the coil can accomodate that higher voltage, then isn't it better? The higher voltage will produce a larger spark, enhancing a MORE complete combustion....Right?

When I hear of a "weak spark", is this referring to a WAY too low voltage?.....hence not enough to even ignite the fuel.

How does the manufacturer figure out what gap to put into the plugs?
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Henry,
I'll do my best he


Henry,
I'll do my best here to answer your questions...

If the plug gap is too spark, you risk pre-ignition...the spark occurs too "early" in the combustion cycle...and will be "weak".

True, a larger gap will cause a "hotter" spark...enhancing more complete combustion, but only to a point. If the mixture is overly weak, combustion will occur, though the "hot" spark conceivably will mask what should have been a mis-fire (fouled plug, in the extreme case).

More is not necessarily better...as a larger plug gap can lead to a mis-fire, if the ignition system isn't up to the task. Also, too large of a spark plug gap can cause unnecessary wear and tear on the rest of the ignition system...such as accelerated cap and rotor wear.

The manufacturers of spark plugs set the plug gap based on the design of the plug, not the specific engine requirements. NGK stated in my conversation with them that their plugs are designed to be gapped +/- .008" of their orginal pre-set gap. NGK does make wide gap plugs, that usually have the suffix -11. Typically these plugs are nominally gapped at around .035-.045".

HTH,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #9
David: My new plugs are pre-g

David: My new plugs are pre-gapped at 0.028 inches. Should I leave this gap alone and just install?

Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Henry,

As you're runnin


Henry,

As you're running the stock ignition unit in the BBi, I'd re-gap the new plugs to a gap of no larger than .025".

Regards,
David
 
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