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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If there ever was a car that e

If there ever was a car that epitomizes sex-on-a-stick it would have to be the Dino 246GT or 246GTS. I owned a 72 246GT for about 5 years. Here are some comments.

You will hear that these cars are fragile. They are not but I do not think they are as well put together as 308's. Remember when the Daytona was selling for $26M in 1972 the 246GT was selling for closer to $10M. That being said I never had any real problems with the car I owned.

This car is somewhat like a small 308 with only 6 cylinders. Engine and trunk access is very similar to the 308. It utilizes a breaker/point distirbutor with mechanical advance and a dino plex ignition unit which is hidden in the RHS of the trunk. On USA spec cars there is a micro switch which activates a second set of points that retard the spark at lower RPM's. In case of emergencies the Dinoplex can be disconnected and the car will run. The front cylinder spark plugs are a little hard to reach but with the right extensions offer only moderate problems getting to.

Starting the car is easy enough. Mine always started quickly and easier than the 12 cylinder cars I have owned. Avoid 2nd gear until the car is warmed up. As with 308's the 2nd gear syncro can cause some concern and should be evaluated in any potential purchase.

The second best thing about the car, in my opinion, is how it drives. The controls are light. You get the feeling you are driving a small sports car with a peppie engine behind you. Shifting is light and you want to shift the car more than you probably should.

Inside the Dino you are in your own little time capsual. The exhaust note is just about perfect. Not overly burdensome but you know you have something back there. The car handles traffic and the twisties well. It will make you go back over the same curve twice just for the hell of it.

Acceleration is not what this car is about. You will get passed by VW's but it doesn't seem to matter. Sitting in the car, with the whine of the engine, the light feel of the controls, it all works.

There were 3 series of these cars made between 1969 and 1973. The first series is generally identified by knock off wheels where as the later series had the more traditional 5 bolt pattern. There is not a lot of difference between series 2 and 3 cars.

You will see the term "chairs and flares". What people are referring to are Daytona style seats and larger wheel arches. Please note the most cars had one of these options and not both.

A book by Doug Nye - Dino, The Little Ferrari, is being re-released in August 2004. If you are seriously interested in these cars they can be ordered at places like Amazon.com
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'm looking into buying a

I'm looking into buying a 1972 Dino 246 GT just like the one you describe. The car has about 90,000 kms (56k miles) and apparently has been serviced by an exotic car mechanic but not by Ferrari.

I'm told that the car is un very good condition, but I still need to look at the car. I will take it to a Ferrari dealer for inspection, how much should I pay for it , assuming it needs no major repairs Thanks...!
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I don't have any knowledge

I don't have any knowledge of what these cars are bringing. My first guess would be to take 10% off the FML asking price. That should get you in the ball park. Maybe someone else can better comment.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi,

I bought a 73 246Gt las


Hi,

I bought a 73 246Gt last year for $70,000. It has 32000 mi, air, power windows and was restored. I've been following the market and that seems to be the adverage price for a number 2 car. Number 1 cars are alot more and number 3 cars alittle less.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the responses. How

Thanks for the responses. How do you define a number 2 and a number 3 cars, I assume it refers to condition but what is a general guideline to this classification?

How good are Ferrari dealer inspections, they make an exterior assessment and test drive the car for $320. I don’t want to buy a problem car and don’t know whether this level of inspection will give me the actual mechanic condition.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would think a true Ferrari d

I would think a true Ferrari dealer inspection is probably pretty good and that they would stand behind something major if it went wrong soon after purchase. If it is a non-Ferrari Dealer I would put less stock in it. At a minimum they should have done a compression test. I would request the results from the compression test and go from there.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's a good point Drew,

That's a good point Drew, Ferrari's service manager did not mention a compression test but I'll have it checked.
I was going to test the car yesterday but apparently it wouldn't start after the owner changed the plugs. He will have it fixed and I'll test it next week.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
>>I don't have any

>>I don't have any knowledge of what these cars are bringing. My first guess would be to take 10% off the FML asking price. That should get you in the ball park. Maybe someone else can better comment.<<

Oh Yea!!!

FML is a reference to be taken on the very low side!

DO NOT have a 246 Dino looked at by a Dealer, are you kidding me? The car is probably older than the Franchise!! Dino's should be PPI'd by someone no younger than 40urs old with at least 20 yrs serious Ferrari experience!!!! These cars can have issues that only an old timer would be familiar with! They can be pricey to bring up to driver friendly specs!

Great Cars when done right & one of the sexiest "afforable" Ferraris ever!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
JRV point well taken, the prob

JRV point well taken, the problem is that I would need to find an experienced mechanic in my area independent to the seller. The current owner services the car with an "experienced exotic car mechanic" but I don't know if I would get an objective opinion from him.

If anyone knows of a good mechanic in the Washington DC please let me know. Thanks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Call Frank at AW Parts..our sp

Call Frank at AW Parts..our sponsor...he surely can give you some names! Tell him AJ said to call...haha! I'm AJ to Frank!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hi,

I use the mechanics at


Hi,

I use the mechanics at Classic Coach in New Jersey, they know 246's and the're 4 hours from DC, also I met at The Reading Concourso some of the guys from Algar Ferrari in PA they also seemed to know the car. But the best is at Wide world of Cars they have two mechanics from Italy I've seen them rebuild both my 246Gt and are completing a 73 246GTS for Pebble Beach.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Good contacts, Algar Ferrari i

Good contacts, Algar Ferrari is probably closer as they are in Philadelphia but will also check on Wide World of Cars.

JRV: I called Frank, great guy who knows what he's talking about!
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Use the Classic Coach guys for

Use the Classic Coach guys for evaluation. The owner, Onofrio (Frank) knows more about old Ferraris and Maseratis than anyone I have ever met. They do service on all my cars and are meticulous. In fact they are the designated FNA shop for all major body repairs. Have them do a PPI.
I just installed a Crane Cams optical ignition unit on my '74 246 GTS (not that I had any problems with the dinoplex), but hid the unit and will paint the coil to match Marelli. Much smoother. Also rebuilt intake manifold and synchronized Webers. Car has A lot more power now, but it was always a blast to drive before. The engine is bulletproof if it was properly maintained.

For comparison sake, this car won a silver at Cavallino, silver at the Hamptons concourse, and best in class at Old Westbury. It's between a 1 and 2 condition (it's not a garage queen)and it is a GTS rather than a GT, but I have been offered just over 100k for it. You should be able to get an excellent #2 GT car for 70-75k. Stay away from low mileage show cars, as they have not been driven enough to keep everything from drying out. 56k miles sounds just right, it's exactly what I have on my car.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am considering the purchase

I am considering the purchase of a Dino 246GT of 1972. I am curious to know whether the chassis plate of the US export model was originally in English (different from the European model) stating the month & year of manufacture and if another tag with technical specs is also typical of the US model (see attachments). Where is the original serial number stamped on the chassis? Many thanks for a quick answer as the matter is urgent.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
The Vin plate on your car look

The Vin plate on your car looks good. The Vin Number (serial number) is on 3 other places that I know of (I'm sure there are more). The first is on the top of the steering wheel column (as it still is today). The other two are in the engine compartment. The first is engraved on the left side top rear enforced corner (easy to see as you look down). The second is on the rear firewall to the left of the cooling system expansion tank. It's rivited and looks like the one on the door post but also has the motor type (not the engine number). The engine number is on the right front side of the engine. It's marked off between a set of stars and hard to see from the top.

Dennis
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I am considering purchasing a

I am considering purchasing a 1972 Dino GT European Spec...What major pluses and minuses does Euro entail? No A/[email protected] 49,000 miles and asking $72,000

Gary
 
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