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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys what ferrari's sh

Hey guys what ferrari's show the least drop in value and what ones show the worst drops in their values? And what would the ebst bet be on making money on a ferrai? Thanks Rog
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
First I don't think you sh

First I don't think you should be looking at any Ferrari for an investment unless its a rare car such as the 250 series or ex-racers and these are 7 figure cars with maybe including the 275GTBs which have increased considerably lately, if you get any appreciation on other models it usually will be offset by maintenance and repair costs unless you just park it.

The cars that take the biggest hits are the latest models being replaced by newer ones, concerning cars that have some potential to appreciate look for the lower production cars with less than 2500 units made such as early 2+2s V12s, Boxers, Daytonas, 330 and 365s etc., later V8s and V12s were produced in larger numbers which will keep the values down.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Roger:
I suggest you wait unt


Roger:
I suggest you wait until 430's start being delivered and see what happens with the rest of the market values. I bet you'll see interesting changes considering the actual trend of the Euro.

VS
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The reason i am asking is beca

The reason i am asking is because my pops and I both love ferrari's and would like to own one, but one probably, MOM! So we are trying to prove to her that a ferrari is the way to go, but all she wants is new diamonds. So i am just trying to get some aimo for my dads and mine arrgument agianst her.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You cannot drive a diamond, bu

You cannot drive a diamond, but you also cannot make love to a Ferrari! LOL!

A Ferrari is only one major failure away from being a big time expense....passion, design, performance, these are all good reasons to buy one.

To invest, call Glickenhaus & Company, and start a portfolio! Better yet, do BOTH!
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lots of fun older cars out the

Lots of fun older cars out there, pick one you like and try it out!

As stated all Ferraris follow a pretty standard depreciation profile from new.....what they do after reaching bottom varies, so do some research!

I studied twelve years, before getting my first 308GTB.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Studied the Ferrari Market, I

Studied the Ferrari Market, I meant to say....

I studied at school a coupe of years longer still! ;)

In between beers.......
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The comment about diamonds is

The comment about diamonds is so typical. If there were ever an manipulated market, the diamond exchange certainly is. While most Ferraris are poor investments at best, at least their price is governed by actual supply and demand with some emotion thrown in, not price controls and a cornered market. Ask your Mom if she could sell her diamond for around what she paid a few months later. Exactly.....
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ferrari PARTS are a manipulate

Ferrari PARTS are a manipulated market, if by the Factory....

But then I just gave the Pontiac dealer $42 for a rocker switch made in Mexico, so no love from there.....LOL!
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I your guy's opinion what

I your guy's opinion what would be the best investment or buy between a testarossa 328,348, and a 355?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
None of them, the 328 will be

None of them, the 328 will be the cheapest maintenance wise by far.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
355's and most 348's s

355's and most 348's still have some depreciating to do. Testarossa and 328 are pretty much fully depreciated, but neither are investment quality. Too many of each were made, and the annual registration, taxes, insurance, maintenance, etc. will more than eat up any appreciation in value.

You almost can't ever justify a Ferrari purchase on economics. The best you can hope for is that they will keep pace with inflation. That said, you also can't put a price on the enjoyment these vehicles bring.

Get a 328 to test the waters. Maintenance is relatively reasonable and parts are fairly easy to get if you do it yourself. If you find it lacking, sell it for what you paid for it and get a 12 cylinder. Just be aware that maintenance and repair costs will be twice that of a 328.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mike B is right on I think.

Mike B is right on I think.

I also think that with the "Muscle car" craze these days it's time to settle into a nice pre-1984 Ferrari...

Let those guys buying '68 Cudas figure out that in reality the were pretty crappy cars new and no matter how clean and buffed they are you can't take the cl-clang out of those doors when they close! The Ferrari's were awesome cars new and still are.

I think the exposure (read depreciation) on well taken care of pre-1984 F-cars will be minimal in the next 10-15 years easily. I by no means think it is something to hang your retirement on but the down side is practically nil.

Now if your a leasing company and just 60 monthed a 1970 Cuda with a buyback of $80k in 5 years I think your exposure will rival Pamela Anderson on Lake Havasu in a home movie...

Just my humble opinion.
 
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