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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just received my new stock clu

Just received my new stock clutch. It is modified in relation to what came off. I have some questions.

Thanks
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I've replaced many Boxer c

I've replaced many Boxer clutches, what would you like to know?
 
G

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
JRV: Have you replaced a Boxe

JRV: Have you replaced a Boxer clutch with the new aluminum "modified" one by AP racing?

Also, any trick in removing the pilot bearing? Mine is bad, and it appears to be really stuck. I bought a slide hammer, for pilot bearings, but it just doesn't want to come out.

Thanks
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Henryk,

No, haven't


Hi Henryk,

No, haven't used the new version yet, looking forward to it though. Looks like a nice design & way overdue imo.

On the pilot bearing issue, I have a 'pilot bearing puller', but ocassionaly heat is still required to break the bond. I've used slide hammer pullers on lots of different bearings also. Carefully heat the crank while trying to remove the bearing, the combination of expansion & vibration really should work.

My home puter crashed so I can't upload pics right now, but maybe I can take some pics of the actual pilot bearing extractor and have someone post if you need to see it.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
JRV: I will try the heat tric

JRV: I will try the heat trick. The slide hammer I have bought is made specifically for pilot bearings.

BTW: Be careful when you install the "new" Boxer clutch. There is a minor problem with the first batch made, including all those shipped to the US. I have been in contact with AP Racing in England, and they state that the clutch, as is, will bind with the ends of the bolts holding the fork that moves against the throw-out bearing (part #60, on page TAV. 15, of the BBi parts manual). The ends of these bolts must be ground down, to the level of the nut holding them. They are "modifying" the clutch, however, it will be a long lead time before these reach the States. Otherwise there is no problem. I hope this helps.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>>and they state that

>>and they state that the clutch, as is, will bind with the ends of the bolts holding the fork that moves against the throw-out bearing <<


That would sure suck, get it all together and it binds!!! Hope you found out beforeit was all together.

Thanks for the "heads up" on that.


Does the new style clutch cost more than the old style?

How much lighter is it if any than the original sytle?

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank goodness, I found out be

Thank goodness, I found out before hand, while inquiring about installation instructions.

Cost was $2200, from Algar.......only ones that had it in stock.

Weight is about the same, or slightly more.

Have you seen it?......looks neat!!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
JRV: The fork shaft in the be

JRV: The fork shaft in the bellhousing is binding some, when moving the fork lever. I placed the unit in a solvent bath, and the movement was totally free. However, the next day, after the solvent was totally evaporated, I noticed the binding again.

I will have to take the shaft apart, to grind down the bolts. My question is; should these bushings, or bearings, be lubed prior to assembly....if so, with what?

There are 3 O-rings in the bell housing. Should these be oiled, prior to assembly? Then, is silicone added around them for a complete seal? The manual states putting some "red paste" around the seams. If so, then should the O-rings go on dry? I don't think it is right to mix the oiled O-ring with silicone sealer. Your thought?????

Thanks
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
O-Ring question first:

I ve


O-Ring question first:

I very rarely ever install an o-ring dry. I lube the o-rings with silicone sealant with enough extra to seal the flange area also as a just in case. It's very rare I use oil on an o-ring either, just clean everything well and lube with sealant of choice.

Here's basically the why of sealing:

The Factory had a huge advantage in the beginning because they used nothing but brand new parts that had zero heat cycles, zero wear, and had never been overtightened. The repair mechanic has none of those advantages on his side. Everything is used, heat cylcled and possibly been overtightened (or under) at some point, leaving the repair mechanic with many issues the designers and Factory never took into account or had to deal with.

The shaft issue:

The shaft shuold move completely freely. I dis-assemble, clean and grease with Graphite Grease. The graphite will continue to lube even if the media goes away with age.

The Bolts;

You can cut them off very short even reducing the nut hieght if neccesary (without fear of them coming loose) as they do hardly any stressful work.

Saw your Flywheel grind job...looked outstanding.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update on Boxer clutches. I h

Update on Boxer clutches. I have found out that the first 28 new clutches have the above problem.....mine is ser. #14......therefore, the ones affected are #'s 1-28.

Here are some pictures of the problem. It is the nut on the clutch body, which hits the bolt. They write: They solve the problem by replacing the 3mm washer with a standard, thinner, washer, and replace the nut with an M5x0.8 kaylok nut......on the shift fork. The protruding pin threads were then ground awasy to provide clearance.

BTW: Thanks for the info.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Great Info.

Seems their fix


Great Info.

Seems their fix is the same as I suggested.

I guess I should mention 'a trick' when fasteners are too long and one fears they may come loose, the nut can be completely removed in some cases and the overhang peened to prevent backing out or in extreme cases (like Rod Bolts on some extreme Turbo Motors) the bolt tips can be welded then ground almost flat (leaving some weld) preventing a bolt from backing out or loosening.

Thanks for the Tips...I'm sure this knowledge will come in handy for others down the line.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
JRV: In order to remove the f

JRV: In order to remove the fork shaft in the bell housing, I had to grind, then drill out the two bolts......even heat wouldn't work. I am soaking the bell housing in solvent over night to free up the bearings.......it seems that the clutch dust, over time, got into the bearings and caused them to become stiff. I will use graphite grease for these 3 bearings.

Interestingly the holes, and studs used, are exactly 0.250 inches. I plan on just using 1/4 inch bolts, with nuts and washers......I will then grind them to a thin size, and lube them with anti-sieze.......what are your thoughts?

What grease would you use to lube the throw-out bearing shaft? I don't want to soak the bearing in solvent, for obvious reasons....I need a grease that will stay thick, and not get onto the clutch discs.

Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Henryk,

on the bolts, why a


Henryk,

on the bolts, why anti-sieze? you should never likely revisit in 20 yrs.

on the TO Sleeve & Internal TO Race I use graphite also, not a whole lot, but a nice coat. Many new TO bearings (from other makes) come with a solid dry graphite ring internally that rides on the sleeve.
 

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i just installed this new ap clutch kit into my 512bbi 1982. problem i am facing is that is works like a toggle switch... on or off ! the friction point is so short ..no progressive grab.. any ideas ? maybe out of ajustment somewhere ?
 

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hey this is good post, with giving a good technical information and thus provide help in many ways in getting and information solving troubles.
 
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