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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know we have cover this befo

I know we have cover this before but I'm getting serious about getting one of these and I'd like to beat a dead horse just one more time before you guys run me off.

I've re-read some of the threads on Ferrari-Talk and another site regarding Daytona spyder conversions and still have a couple of questions.

First, regarding body flex: I believe Jim Glickenhaus has posted that on a lift you can observe body flex to the point that it is noticable and that doors can pop open. I may be misreading what Jim is saying but is there that much flex that even if supported in front of the doors and behind the doors on a two post lift it bends that much?

Second, is there enough flex that it really matters: I am not going to track the car. Hell, I'd probably be afraid to push it that hard around a curve. But I would get my foot into it now and then. A little front hood shake over a RR track doesn't matter.

Third, Sheehan and Straman conversions: a) Any difference between the two and b) any difference to those that people advertise that have been converted in Italy or here in the USA with a Scagleiti (sorry about the spelling; engineer not a speller) clip.

I'm leaning towards a nice car that has had a Sheehan or Straman conversion and has been gone through and had the rust and past sins taken care of.

Finally, does $130 to $150M get it done: Done means, very very nice older restoration with some history but no matter what you do there are always some issues.

Bill Badurski, Jim Gickenhaus, JRV, and anyone else who could help, I would sincerely appreciate your discussion and opinions on this.

Drew Altemara
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hi Drew,


Which one is bet


Hi Drew,


Which one is better is a hard question to answer, yes they ALL flex when put on a hoist, even originals, and so do 308 S's for that matter, as well as many orher convertibles. What I would be careful of is how the frame was stiffened. I have seen examples where the second frame was simply tack welded in a few places and the material used for the underframe frame was well..chinsy I guess would describe it. I cannot remember offhand what exactly are the tell tale signs of a Straman or Sheehan. Obviously the cars modded with a factory facimile section welded in would be the most desirable imo. I have seen no quality differences of note with cars done in Italy or here, in fact the ones done here correctly are probably better imo.

After the conversion quality the single biggest issue will be engine quality...Daytona engine work can add up quick. Then of course the general condition of the body, suspension, brakes etc. If you find the right car at a price you are comfirtable with I don't see how you can go wrong.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Drew,
Jim's comments abou


Drew,
Jim's comments about chassis flex are true. I have a two post hoist and one of the domestic conversion cars I worked a few years ago did exhibit this on the hoist. The doors still could be opened, but a noticeable drop occurred when doing so. Not a big deal, as when closing the tapered guide realigns the door into the latch. My car has the chassis mods, and doesn't do this. Maybe good luck, or truth to the braces theory. In either case, should not deter you from buying one. I submitted a lengthy article with photos and drawings of the conversion differences to Forza, who plan to publish in July. In the meantime, if you need anything specific just E-mail me.

The everyday use of one of these cars, braces or not, is fine. Even the non-braced cars are no worse than factory Corvette convertibles of the same era with respect to chassis flex and cowl shake.

The price you mentioned should indeed get a car. I would not part with mine for that amount, but as JRV points out I have rebuilt the engine and trans, adding a considerable amount to the value. Also mine was done by Bacchelli and has all the correct mods and small details, so it's at the top of the heap in my opinion.

One thing I have noticed on some of the domestic conversions is both a lousy fitting top when put up, and a poor recreation of the tonneau cover. Check these out when shopping.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Drew,
Have fun, that's al


Drew,
Have fun, that's always a great experience. Oh, and if you have a chance, drive through a covered bridge or tunnel with the revs up and top down... it's an amazing sound.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks Bill,

I called Steve


Thanks Bill,

I called Steve Ahlgrim the other day, who I'm sure you know, to get the show on the road. Steve has been my "partner in crime" in finding me a number of good cars over the years.

If you hear of anything please let either Steve or myself know. Thanks again for your input.

Regards,

Drew

[email protected]
 
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