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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
While doing my major, on the T

While doing my major, on the TR, I am replacing all round rubber seals, on the front of the engine........even if they didn't leak........those that didn't, where very dry and hard (last major in 1997).

Has anyone ever had to replace the circular steel, that the inside diameter of the seal rides on? Do they ever wear out? I would think that they would need replacing if pitted, but mine where all smooth. I can see, but not feel, where the ID of the rubber seal was riding on.

I noticed that the front cam steel portions can be replaced.......they are held in with pins. The rear portions appear to be part of the camshaft. How about things like the front, and rear, main seal contacts?.........would one have to replace the crank, if they wore out?

Curious, since I read so many that have leaks AFTER replacing the seals.

How do you prepare the circular steel contact? I use crocus cloth, and clean it very dry with brake cleaner spray. I then apply grease to the ID of the seal. Is there a better way?

Thanks
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
>Has anyone ever had to re

>Has anyone ever had to replace the circular steel, that the inside diameter of the seal rides on?<

Henry,

it is extremly rare on all engines but not unheard of. It is possible for a rubber seal to harden enough to wear a groove in the steel making an oil tight seal immpossible. The first step in repairing he race is sanding with 1000/1200/1600 to smooth any imperfections, then removing the lip spring from the seal and snipping a small piece off the open end, screwing back together and reinstalling in the seal lip. At some point, very, very old well worn engines a further step up on repair procedure may be needed such as sleeving.

>>Curious, since I read so many that have leaks AFTER replacing the seals.>>>

99.999999% of the time caused by improper instalation of one form or another. There are dozens of things that can go wrong.

Your prep sounds fine. Don't use to course of grit. Very clean, install seals carefully and striaght, dont bend the inner steel support in any way.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks JRV: Crocus cloth is f

Thanks JRV: Crocus cloth is finer than 1600 sand paper.

"then removing the lip spring from the seal and snipping a small pieve off the open end, screwing back together and reinstalling in the seal lip." Interesting!!!! Do you do this on a regular basis, or just where some wear is seen?
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi Henry,

snipping the spri


Hi Henry,

snipping the spring is not used that often, but if the surface wear is suspect it is a viable preventative procedure. I don't have the engeneering specs for lip to race pressure handy, but occasionly additional pressure is required for a long term oil tight seal. Whether it's a seal issue, race issue, crankcase pressure issue, design issue or a combination of some or all I can't really say.

Regards, JRV
 
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