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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Regarding the America: info on

Regarding the America: info on the engine(s), please. Number of cylinders, displacement, dohc or not, etc. TIA
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I don't know what the Amer

I don't know what the America is,
But the 410 Superamerica series I, II and III were produced from 1956 - 1959.
It had a Lampredi designed 60 degree V-12 with dual single overhead cams, and 3 twin choke Weber carbs.
The displacement of the engine was 4962cc, or around 302 cubic inches, putting out about 340 HP from the 8.5:1 compression version, and around 400 HP from the 9:1 compression version that was available in 1958 and 1959.

The 400 Superamerica series I and II were produced from 1960 - 1964.
It had a Colombo designed 60 degree V-12 engine with dual single overhead cams, and 3 twin choke Weber carbs.
Displacement went down on this engine to 3967cc, or about 242 cubic inches, with a compression ratio of 9.8:1 and a claimed horse power rating of around 400 @ 6750 rpm in the early 400 Sas model, while most had 8.8:1 compression at around 340 HP.

If you were referring to some other Ferrari called the "America" please let me know.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think they have christened t

I think they have christened the new folding roof 575 as the new one.......
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Damned new fan-geld cars!
Jus


Damned new fan-geld cars!
Just when I thought I knew about cars,
Bam... it's 1980!
I mean 1990.
Err ahh 2000.
What... oh, 2005!
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lawrence - Are you referring t

Lawrence - Are you referring to a 330 America GT or possibly a 342 America? Or, as an earlier post suggested, are you referring to a Super America? Please specify.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
>>Damned new fan-geld

>>Damned new fan-geld cars!
Just when I thought I knew about cars,
Bam... it's 1980!
I mean 1990.
Err ahh 2000.
What... oh, 2005!<<

LOLOLOL...ain't it the truth!!!
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Memory does not serve, which i

Memory does not serve, which is why I asked for "engine(s)": the America I recall was a GT. I don't know the America 342. When I was informed that the America had a "straight 12" engine, I suggested a bet... (grin) But proving my contention has proved difficult, because I'm in Bangkok and references are thin on the ground here. Thanks to everybody. -- BTW, was there EVER a straight 12 Ferrari, production or racing??
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The Superamericas were the sup

The Superamericas were the super cars of thier time, for only a select few........they were the largest V12s offered for street Ferraris, IIRC.

Not straight 12s. V12s, later 'flattened' into 180 degree V angle, to make the legendary F1 engines and later used in the Boxer series and Testarossa. So even the 'flat' 12s are called Vs by the Factory. You win!

Stop by anytime!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
By the time you get to flat 12

By the time you get to flat 12 cylinder engines there are two reealistic orrentations for the crankshaft: A) horizontally opposed (like Porsche) of B) common crankpin (Ferrari, VolksWagon).

In the horizontally opposed catagory are all the regular Porsche engines. Each set of opposed cylinders and each connecting rod is attached to the crankshaft with a non-shared journal (180 degrees apart) and both pistons travel towards and away from TDC simultaneously--leading to very good balance and low vibrational forces. However, the crankshaft is relatively unsupported in the web between the opposed conrod journals.

By the time you get to 8 cylinders (12 is even better), there are enough throws on a common journal crankshaft that (center of gravity movement) vibrations are not that hard to control. Indeed, the legendary flat V12 (F312 Ts and Bs mid-late 1970 F1) got away with only 4 main bearings because the balance was so good. This engine dominated F1 until underbody aerodynamics showed a major deficiency in engines this wide and big underbody tunnels/venturies. These engines are still considered V12 engines because of the common journal crankshaft it is just that the angle between banks is 180 degrees rather than 60 degrees. It is also possible to build V12s of 120 degrees, although I have yet to see one.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Great, thanks! By "straig

Great, thanks! By "straight 12" I did not mean opposed, but a single row of 12. Don't recall that anybody ever made one... Mercedes was worried about the crank flexing in their straight six (50's Le Mans car, 300 SLR IIRC), so the power was taken off by a gear between cyls 3 and 4! Seems to me a straight 12 would be a nightmare in every way. Can't imagine Ferrari even thinking about it. Hence the bet.
 
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