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Discussion Starter #1
I have measured the valve clea

I have measured the valve clearances, and about 8 are off; 7 exhaust and 1 intake. The exhaust are all on one side of the engine.

I want to remove all the shims that need changing first, and then get the proper sizes........Rutland sells them for $4 each.

If I start removing shims, can I still turn the engine over (by hand) to get at the various shims, without damaging the cams? It seems that without the shims, the cam lobe may ride on the shim support......can it scratch the cam lobe?

When I start getting shims, should I try to achieve the greater clearance range?
 
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Discussion Starter #2
Good question Henry: Kinda pr

Good question Henry: Kinda pricey at $4 each for the shims, I've read that a Volvo application uses the same shims for between $1 and $2 each. I have also heard of doing the "no-no" of surface grinding the shim, and then installing this side down away from the contact surfaces. The hard part I guess would be keeping the heat down and not warping it. How many shims are in a bucket on average? I imaging you can remove them and mix and match to limit the amount you'll have to purchase. By asking about achieving "greater clearance range" do you mean to the higher end of the tolerance for gap? I would say yes, shoot for the mean or greater for the exhaust valves, and shoot for the mean for the intake valves. I will be interested to hear what others have to say on this subject.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I think you only want one shim

I think you only want one shim per location. I had to resort to surface grinding on one or two shims on my 308 to obtain the desired clearance. Shims vary +/- 0.025 mm within a given range. With luck, you get a good one. I placed the ground surface of the shims down, away from the cam. The surface contacting the cam was new, with the factory finish. After several thousand miles, everything seems ok.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Hi Jeff: Since I got no answe

Hi Jeff: Since I got no answer, I proceeded to remove the shims and rotate the engine, till I put the cams in a position to remove more shims. There was a "hang-up", due to the cam coming down on the edge of the shim insert wall......but it didn't appear to be much.

I agree that I could mix-and-match the shims. I will do the measurements tomorrow morning, while having breakfast.....have Fridays off.

I e-mailed Newco a request for price of a set of shims, and copper washers.....if I should sell the car, I can always sell these on E-Bay.

I agree that $4 each is high. But for $1-2 each, I wouldn't consider doing the no-no method.

There is only one shim in a bucket. The minimum space for the exhaust should be 0.35-0.40mm. The one's that where off where reading about 0.31-0.33mm.....not much, but I will still change them. The bucket shims removed where about 3.9-4.05mm.

I will try to get the exhaust closer to 0.40mm, since these get the hottest, and will wear the most. I recall that your clearances where right on. Well, my car has 70K miles on it, while yours has only 30K? This tells me that the valve adjustment seems to be within spec for quite a while!!!! So, you are good for another 40K miles!
 
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Discussion Starter #5
BTW Jeff: Where are you at in

BTW Jeff: Where are you at in doing the major. I just recieved a large box from Rutlands, today. I will get the belts next week. But, I can proceed in cleaning the engine, spraying some paint on it, start to change seals, etc.

Was the crank pulley bolt hard to get off?.....I will be replacing my front main seal.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Valve adjustment basics for 2V

Valve adjustment basics for 2V and 4V cars:

All 2V shims/applications are the same diameter, but larger than the 4V shims...
2v shims are the same as Fiat

All 4V shims/applications are the same diameter, but small than the 2V shims...
4V shims may be the same as Volvo

One shim per bucket...and always replace with new.

Most OE shims (2V or 4V) will be 3.85-4.05mm from the factory. Shims come in increments of .05 mm (.002"), but should always be measured (new and old) to verify actual size.

Exhaust valves tend to tighten...intakes tend to loosen. Clearance can be set to the loose end on specs for exhaust...and mid-range, if possible for the intakes. There is no reason to deviate from factory specs.

I'm not in favor of ever grinding a shim, as they are surface hardened...and any angular misalignment between the cam and the bucket can result in very expensive cam wear. (I've seen the results of an ejected shims, due to grinding...major cam damage!

In theory, one could measure the clearance, determine the new shim size...and find out that the new shim is now on the tight end of the range, and out of spec.

The safest way to do a valve adjustment is to measure, determine your needs...and order extra shims in the size you need (as the same marked size can vary in thickness)...and order shims plus or minus one size of what you think you need.

I had intended on writing a valve adjustment procedure over the Winter, as my BB will be due for its first service then....

Measuring the clearances: Engine cold. Lobe should be perpendicular to the bucket..Using a feeler gauge .001" thicker, verify no-go. Using a feeler gauge speced at the minimum thickness, verify "go", with light drag on the feeler. If both conditions are OK, clearance is fine. Always inspect cam lobes for sharp edges on the "ramp"...
Only do one lobe at a time and don't turn the engine without a shim in place...as lobe damage can occur. Personally, after I replace a shim, I turn the engine over once or twice to ensure that the shim is completely seated...then recheck the clearance. The easiest way to do this is with a remote starter harness (hooks across the started solenoid.)

Example:

Spec: .012"-014" Exhaust valve
Measure: .011" (too tight by .001")
Shim: 4.85mm (marked, not measured)
(.05mm=.002")
New shim: 4.80mm (marked, not measured)

If marked=measured...New valve clearance=.013"

No real need to beat yourself up, trying to hit 014" on the money.

Shims are ordered and supplied using the metric numbers...


Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Henry,

The crank pullet is


Henry,

The crank pullet is 36mm. Blast it off with an air wrench. It will then pull off with a little effort...and a puller will not be needed. To reinstall, lock the flywheel with a prybar, and torque to specs using the WSM.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks David: What is the pro

Thanks David: What is the problem with mix-an-matching the shims that I already have.....if they measure to what they read? The shims that are correct are still being used......so why brand new?

I have decided not to take off the front engine cover. Due to the nuts, at the bottom, it seems that it will only come off by removing the engine block from the trans.......this is going TOO far.

BTW: How is the search going for the tester?

Thanks
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Henry,

The question of re-u


Henry,

The question of re-using shims has been around for a while. IMO, I don't re-use them, as my feeling is that they develope a wear pattern unique to the particular cam lobe...and abnormal wear can occur if they're moved to another lobe.

For doing a major service, there is no need to ever remove the front cover...The secondary timing shaft bearings in the block rarely go bad.

Tester: An inquiry was made...but I've been travelling today and tomorrow on business, so no time to follow up on availability. Soon, I hope.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks David: I think that I

Thanks David: I think that I will order the set of shims from Newco, and NOT turn my engine any more.

I am in no hurry for the tester.

BTW: The FI tester works great. I am finding a few "weak" injectors. However, the replacement is of a different number, and of brass....not steel. I don't feel that I want to mix these up. So, I am considering just buying 12 of the new injectors. Your thoughts?
 
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Discussion Starter #11
Henry,

In the long run, a s


Henry,

In the long run, a shim kit is a wise investment...I have one for 2v and 4V cars...thought the 4V is seriously lacking shim selections.

I believe I had a conversation with Jeff about the injectors. The short story is that you really shouldn't mix and match. The newer injector has an improved nozzel..and will provide better, consistent long term performance...

Sometimes, weak injectors will "clean-up" if popped enough on the tester. Honestly, I just throw them away..and buy new.

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #12
David: Because of the overall

David: Because of the overall "better" performance of the new injectors, I will order 12 for the TR. I will use the injector tester to occasionally test the injectors, say after 15K miles. The injectors on the Boxer are new.

I will order the 4V shim set........any odd ball one needed, then I will just buy that one.

BTW: How many miles does your BB have on it?

Thanks.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Henry,

Often times, even wi


Henry,

Often times, even with a complete shim kit...you'll find that all the shims you need are the same size. The shim kits usually come with 4 shims of each size...hence you'll need to order more of a specific size. Unfortunately, I can't predict if this will be true on your car. If you get in a bind for a shim or two, drop me a note and I'll check if I have them. Rutland's does sell shims individually, though.

My BB has about 26,000km on her..

Regards,
David
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Hi Henry...Hi David: Getting

Hi Henry...Hi David: Getting a good education reading your conversation. Henry-the cost for new injectors and o-rings was $258 delivered I believe, from the source David suggested (importtec). It gives me peace of mind knowing that my car will have new ones. As for my progress, I'm still working on the fuel dist. lines. It is a VERY labor intensive job and I'm sorry I started it, but now am committed to finishing it. I have experimented with different finishes using paints and stuff, but what looks promising is "yellow anodizing" spray. The surface must be polished or at least very very clean, then you do a prep to it and lightly spray several coats of this yellow watery looking stuff on till the desired look is achieved. I tried it on a scrap piece of metal and it looked pretty good. It has a gawd-awful rotten odor to it when spraying...it will drive you out of the room. I buffed the lines for about 5 hours last night on the dist. lines and must finish up today by hand on the little tight areas. Oh...in the process of shopping around for the copper seal rings, I somehow lost a banjo bolt! I've looked everywhere. I suspect one of my cats (Mattie) may have hidden it somewhere. She has a fetish for pens and pencils, and hides them behind the sofa. Every few weeks I move the sofa and find a little stack of pens and pencils placed in a small bonfire pattern. I just hope she doesn't decide to have a bonfire! Strange cat anyways. Henry: I ordered a bunch of copper seal rings and they should arrive today or tomorrow. I'll have extra so if you need any just let me know. I'll have to call Rutlands and order a new banjo bolt today.
 
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Discussion Starter #15
>>I'll have to cal

>>I'll have to call Rutlands and order a new banjo bolt today.<<

I think I have spares laying around somewhere. If so and you're not in a big hurry I'll look around next week and send you one.

Regards, JRV
 
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Discussion Starter #16
Thank You JRV !!! It is for o

Thank You JRV !!! It is for one of the six lines going to the fuel injectors. If you wouldn't mind I would like to send you a SASE to minimize the hassle to you. I wish I had something you could use (except money). I work at an automotive spring company and can get, or sometimes make, oddball springs. We do mainly brake applications, but are doing valve and trans clutch springs for some of the big car companies. Just let me know, and Thanks Again!
 
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